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6-2 Books

6-2.1 General

6-2.1.1 Definition of Book

For packaging purposes only, a book is defined as a printed item with 24 pages or more, fastened together along one edge between hardback covers, paperback covers, or self-covers. All catalogs and similar printed material that meet this definition may be packaged as books.

6-2.1.2 Containersbook.

A fiberboard box of the right size and grade is generally the best type of container for mailing books. If a book is lighter than 1 pound and thinner than 1 inch, it may be mailed in a letter-style envelope. If the book is heavier than 1 pound or thicker than 1 inch, the envelope must be a stronger type, as defined in 2-5.

6-2.1.3 Causes of Damage

A mailing of books or catalogs can become damaged principally for the following reasons:

• The outer container collapses or falls apart because the closure, reinforcement, or size and strength of the container are insufficient.

• The contents shift within the mailing container in transit because bracing or internal packaging is inadequate.

To prevent shifting of the contents or damage to the contents and mailing container, empty spaces in a container holding books must be filled with cushioning material.

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6-2.2 Books up to 5 Pounds

6-2.2.1 Packing

A mailing of books weighing up to 5 pounds must be packed in a close-fitting paperboard or fiberboard box, padded or reinforced bag (with an exterior ply of at least 60-pound basis weight), or paper wraps (corrugated or of at least 60-pound basis weight). The mailing container should be at least 1/4 inch thick. For a paperboard mailing container, the books inside should support the container and should fit snugly enough to restrict any lateral shift to no more than 1/2 inch.

For a mailing of paperback books weighing up to 3 pounds, shrinkwrap may be used as the only packaging method. Shrinkwrap should have a coefficient of friction (ability to slide on a smooth, hard surface) between 0.025 and 0.040 on metal surfaces at 20- to 25-degree elevations. Shrinkwrap is not acceptable as the only packaging method for hardback books thicker than 1 inch or heavier than 1 pound.

6-2.2.2 Closing

The mailing container must be closed with multiple friction closures (the insertion of more than one flap or tab), staples or steel stitching (completely clinched to avoid injuries in handling), heat sealing, adhesive, tape, or nonmetallic banding. Shrinkwrap may be used on the exterior of an otherwise properly closed container.

6-2.3 Books From 5 to 10 PoundsPackaging.

6-2.3.1 Packing

A mailing of books weighing from 5 to 10 pounds must be packed in at least a 175-pound test fiberboard box (or equivalent). It is a good idea to use a buffer above and below the books to protect them in case the box is opened with a sharp instrument.

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6-2.3.2 Closing

The mailing container must be closed with adhesive, reinforced tape, or firmly applied nonmetallic banding. For nonmetallic banding to be acceptable, the bands must be tight enough to depress the edges of the container, as illustrated in 4-3. Reinforced tape or nonmetallic banding is adequate both to close and to reinforce the container.

6-2.4 Books From 10 to 25 Pounds

6-2.4.1 Packing

A mailing of books weighing from 10 to 25 pounds must be packed in at least a 200-pound test fiberboard box (or equivalent).

6-2.4.2 Closing

The mailing container must be closed with adhesive, reinforced paper tape, reinforced plastic tape, pressure-sensitive filament tape, or firmly applied nonmetallic banding. For nonmetallic banding to be acceptable, the bands must be tight enough to depress the edges of the container.

The container should be banded or reinforced in the direction providing the most support. For this purpose, reinforced paper tape, reinforced plastic tape, pressure-sensitive filament tape, or firmly applied nonmetallic banding should be used. Reinforced tape or nonmetallic banding is adequate both to close and to reinforce the container.

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6-2.5 Books From 25 to 50 Pounds

6-2.5.1 Packing

A mailing of books weighing from 25 to 50 pounds must be packed as follows: for hardback books, in at least a 275-pound test fiberboard box (or equivalent); for paperback books, in at least a 200-pound test fiberboard box (or equivalent).

6-2.5.2 Closing

The mailing container must be closed with adhesive, reinforced paper tape, reinforced plastic tape, pressure-sensitive filament tape, or firmly applied nonmetallic banding. For nonmetallic banding to be acceptable, the bands must be tight enough to depress the edges of the container.

The container should be banded or reinforced at two points to provide the most support. For this purpose, reinforced paper tape, reinforced plastic tape, pressure-sensitive filament tape, or firmly applied nonmetallic banding should be used.

6-2.6 Books From 50 to 70 Pounds

6-2.6.1 Packing

A mailing of books weighing from 50 to 70 pounds must be packed as follows: for hardback books, in at least a 350-pound test fiberboard box (or equivalent); for paperback books, in at least a 275-pound test fiberboard box (or equivalent).

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6-2.6.2 Closing

The mailing container must be closed with adhesive, reinforced paper tape, reinforced plastic tape, pressure-sensitive filament tape, or firmly applied nonmetallic banding. For nonmetallic banding to be acceptable, the bands must be tight enough to depress the edges of the container.

The container should be banded or reinforced at two points to provide the most support. For this purpose, reinforced paper tape, reinforced plastic tape, pressure-sensitive filament tape, or firmly applied nonmetallic banding should be used.

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