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730 Shortpaid Mail to the United States

731 Computation of Postage Due

a. The postal service of the country of origin identifies and marks shortpaid mail with a T stamp. Next to the T is a fraction that consists of the amount of postage deficiency (expressed in its own currency) divided by the country's international surface letter rate at the first increment.

b. The receiving exchange office in the United States multiplies the T fraction by the U.S. international letter rate to determine the shortpaid amount in U.S. currency. This amount, plus a $0.50 handling charge, accounts for the postage-due amount to be collected on delivery. The postage-due formula is:

Picture of postage-due formula

c. The receiving exchange office in the U.S. will imprint stock rubber stamp R-1300-4, Postage Due . . . Cents, and enter the amount of postage due.

d. The delivery office will collect postage-due mail in accordance with DMM 604 and Handbook F-1, Post Office Accounting Procedures.

732 Shortpaid Letters and Cards From Canada

Shortpaid mail from Canada is marked with a T in a circle with the actual amount to be collected entered in the circle. No handling charge is assessed or collected on shortpaid mail from Canada.

733 Shortpaid Items Bearing U.S. Postage

If an item bears U.S. postage, the delivery office must allow credit for its value when postage due is collected.

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